Scouts

Scouts is the third section in the scouting family, and is typically seen as the original section.  Scouts are 10.5-14yrs old. As an active scout troop, we get up to all sorts of exciting and adventurous activities, both in our regular meetings and on camps and visits. The Titan Scout group meet on Fridays 19:30 – 21:30.

Who are Scouts?


Scouts are a go-getting group of young people aged
10 ½ to 14 who: 

  • Master new skills and try new things
  • Make new friends
  • Have fun and go on adventures, at home and abroad
  • Explore the world around them
  • Help others and make a difference, in their own communities and beyond


Week in and week out, they gather in groups called Scout Troops to conquer the small task of changing the world.

Who leads Scouts?

Each Scout Troop is made up of young people aged 10½  to 14, led by trained adult volunteers who are on hand to share their skills and keep everyone safe. Traditionally, Scout leaders were nicknamed ‘Skip’ – an abbreviation of ‘Skipper’, which is a name given to a ship’s captain. In some Troops this name is still used, but these days it’s more common for Scout leaders to just use their real names.

 

Within their Troop, Scouts are part of a Patrol – smaller groups of Scouts who look out for one another, and help each other grow. Scouts usually gather in their Patrols at the beginning and end of meetings. They might also stick together on expeditions or trips away, or during certain activities.

The bigger Scout family

Scouts are probably the most well-known members of the global Scout family.

Closer to home, they’re also part of their wider local Scout Group, alongside Beavers (aged 6-8) and Cubs (aged 8 to 10 1/2). When they’re older, they can also join Explorers (for young people aged 14 to 18) and Scout Network (for young people aged 18-25). Although both of these are closely associated with the younger sections, they are not part of the local Scout Group.

Depending on local arrangements, their troop might be partnered directly with an Explorer Unit. If this is the case for your troop, you might run your meetings alongside Explorers, and work together to organise things like trips, nights away and expeditions.

Promises and Ceremonies

Every Scout is unique, but they find common ground in their shared Scout values, and make a promise to stick by them.

Making a promise when you join the Troop is a way of celebrating these values. Every time a new Scout decides to join, they chat through their promise with their leader before saying it out loud in front of their fellow Scouts.  

The process usually takes place once you’ve had a few weeks to settle in, and is known as being ‘invested’ into Scouts. Usually, the promise ceremony happens in a place you’ve chosen, or in a memorable place that means a lot to the group.

It could be held in your usual meeting place, or it could happen around the campfire, or it could happen on a boat sailing the seven seas. Regardless, it’s a big celebration for all involved, and it’s not uncommon for family and friends to join your fellow Scouts as they cheer you on.

A similar ceremony – known as a Moving On ceremony – usually happens once you reach the end of your time at Scouts. It’s an opportunity to celebrate all you’ve achieved and conquered and enjoyed – including that time you moved mountains, and laughed so hard on camp you spurted lemonade out of your nose. It’s also a chance to properly say goodbye, and send you on your merry way.